Author Archives: Marion Witte

About Marion Witte

Marion Witte was born and raised on a farm on the prairies of North Dakota. It was there that she acquired her Midwestern work ethic and her philosophy of helping others. Marion enjoyed a successful career as an entrepreneur, and upon selling her various business interests she began pursuing a life of philanthropy. She is passionate and outspoken about the need for radical changes in the way we view children and parenting. Her memoir “Little Madhouse on the Prairie” relays the story of her life, and it is the basis of her commitment to this work. She founded and manages the Angel Heart Foundation and its sister organizations "Next Generation Parenting" and "Brave New Leaders."

Keeping Your Kids Safe From Predators

Keeping Your Kids Safe From Predators

Whether there are actually more predators trying to harm kids, or whether our awareness as a society of these predators has actually increased, more parents are becoming aware of their need to protect their children. Part of the problem with protecting your kids from predators is that, like a lion that sneaks up on its prey in the wilderness, child predators are often good at blending in and not raising people’s suspicions. Continue reading

Understanding Teen “Cutting”

Understanding Teen “Cutting”

If you or your child know someone who is cutting, make it your top priority to let that person know that you really care. Don’t shame or judge the person, don’t make fun of the person, and don’t treat the person like a freak. Cutters don’t cut for attention, but sometimes paying attention can go a long way in helping a cutter grow strong and happy enough to kick the habit. Above all, if you want to help, become the good listener that the cutter can trust.
Continue reading

Tips for Cultivating Empathy in Children

Tips for Cultivating Empathy in Children

Teaching children how to feel empathy can take time and patience. Some children naturally absorb the notion of understanding other’s feelings as they mature, yet all children need parental modeling and other techniques to be able to first feel empathy. This leads to developing the capacity to act with compassion, and eventually to the ability to forgive.
Continue reading

The Difference Between Confidence and Arrogance!

The Difference Between Confidence and Arrogance!

True confidence is a feeling of inner security. Confident people do not feel the need to compare themselves to others or to belittle the accomplishments of anyone else. Raise children with secure confidence tempered by humbleness, and they will be well-adjusted adults. Continue reading

Should My Teen Be My Facebook Friend?

Should My Teen Be My Facebook Friend?

A recent report from the Pew Research Center found that the parents who friended their children on Facebook were most likely to talk to their teens about online safety. On the other hand, the survey found that these parents were much more likely to experience conflict with their teens about social media. Continue reading

Teaching A Child About Generosity

Teaching A Child About Generosity

Raising generous children is a process, and there will be times when you’ll experience disappointment and dismay at your child’s selfish impulses. However, if you continue modeling the behaviors you want to encourage, helping your child remember to think of others before herself, and talking about lapses in judgment, you’ll be teaching her the right lessons.
Continue reading

Teaching Your Children About Thankfulness

Teaching Your Children About Thankfulness

The holidays are a time of giving, but kids often think the holidays are all about what they are going to get. Battling your child’s natural selfish inclinations isn’t easy, but it is worth it. Take some time this holiday season to win the battle for their attitudes. The rewards will stretch far beyond the holidays. Continue reading

Innovative Shift in Education Taking Place in England

Innovative Shift in Education Taking Place in England

Some kids learn by listening; others learn by doing. Geoff Mulgan gives a short introduction to the Studio School, a new kind of school in the UK where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, as Mulgan puts it, “for real.” Underlying it all are the very simple ideas that large numbers of teenagers learn best by doing things, they learn best in teams and they learn best by doing things for real — all the opposite of what mainstream schooling actually does. Continue reading