Blog Archives

Talking to Teens about Forgiveness

Talking to Teens about Forgiveness

Consider the wisdom of this anonymous quote: “Not forgiving someone is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.” Although the term “forgive” seems to imply that the other person is the one getting a great gift, it’s the one that has the ability to forgive that is receiving the most notable reward. Continue reading

Spoiling Children: A Look at Seven Common Myths

Spoiling Children: A Look at Seven Common Myths

Sometimes myths are just that – myths. And that may include the concept of “spoiling” children. This article includes some interesting professional observations about this topic from the vantage point of child development, parenting techniques and useful tools. Continue reading

The Difference Between Confidence and Arrogance!

The Difference Between Confidence and Arrogance!

True confidence is a feeling of inner security. Confident people do not feel the need to compare themselves to others or to belittle the accomplishments of anyone else. Raise children with secure confidence tempered by humbleness, and they will be well-adjusted adults. Continue reading

Neurofeedback Therapy for Children with ADD and ADHD

An advantage to neurofeedback therapy for ADD and ADHD is the fact that changes appear to be much more permanent. Unlike medication that wears off after a few hours and only masks the problem in the first place, neurofeedback therapy appears to actually have longer- lasting behavioral effects. Continue reading

When Parents Take Over-Protectiveness to the Extreme

When Parents Take Over-Protectiveness to the Extreme

A parent’s neurotic behavior serves as a blueprint after which a child will model their own lives. The unfortunate outcroppings of teaching a child to give in to inappropriate fears are wide ranging. At the very least, children suffer from a sense of powerlessness, lack of confidence, and low self-esteem. The worst cases, however, are characterized by debilitating levels of anxiety, chronic clinical depression, and suicidal tendencies. Continue reading

Teaching A Child About Generosity

Teaching A Child About Generosity

Raising generous children is a process, and there will be times when you’ll experience disappointment and dismay at your child’s selfish impulses. However, if you continue modeling the behaviors you want to encourage, helping your child remember to think of others before herself, and talking about lapses in judgment, you’ll be teaching her the right lessons.
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Teaching Your Children About Thankfulness

Teaching Your Children About Thankfulness

The holidays are a time of giving, but kids often think the holidays are all about what they are going to get. Battling your child’s natural selfish inclinations isn’t easy, but it is worth it. Take some time this holiday season to win the battle for their attitudes. The rewards will stretch far beyond the holidays. Continue reading

Can Students Benefit from Mindfulness Training?

Can Students Benefit from Mindfulness Training?

Becoming mindful is, indeed, a simple concept, but it is not always an easy task to accomplish. The reason for the difficulty is that our brains have been conditioned to put all of our attention on past events or fretfully construct and contemplate our future. Continue reading

The Collision Between the Teenager and Mid-Life Parents

The Collision Between the Teenager and Mid-Life Parents

Many times, parents are overwhelmed with their own struggle with mortality and they feel somewhat vulnerable in the face of the youthful actions and carefree style of teens. But your budding adult needs for you to remember that their healthy journey into adulthood is dependent upon a sound relationship with you – their parent. Continue reading

Affirming Your Child’s Voice: How and When to Encourage Your Child to Speak Up

Affirming Your Child’s Voice: How and When to Encourage Your Child to Speak Up

We want our children to be creative thinkers and share their ideas. Yet, we don’t always applaud when they publicly state opinions about school rules or challenge a teacher’s grading system. We want our teens to start thinking for themselves, but we often chastise them when those thoughts reveal beliefs that are contrary to our family morals or societal norms. Continue reading